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#91 2018-04-16 15:33:47

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

colak wrote #311052:

Make that Cyprus :)

Noted. Sorry. I read that in your site too, and it still came out wrong. I’m vaguely aware of Cyprus history, but refreshing up on it just now was worthwhile. You’re in the internationally recognized side, I take it?


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#92 2018-04-16 15:44:03

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

phiw13 wrote #311063:

what happens with AMP pages?

You probably don’t want to hear what I would suggest about AMP (Google in general).

But I don’t know what kind of data AMP has access to in your code. Depends on what’s marked up, I guess. If it’s got fingers on private data, then me thinks that would concern the third-party ‘pocessor’ sections of the GDPR because that’s what Google is in that case, I think. You’re not paying them to process data, but you’ve kind of entered an agreement with them to do so by using their “free” service.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#93 2018-04-16 16:00:22

michaelkpate
Moderator
From: Avon Park, FL
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,118
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #311074:

You probably don’t want to hear what I would suggest about AMP (Google in general).

I think AMP was wonderful as we ended up with pages that loaded in 1-2 seconds instead of 20-30. Yes, Google bullied Publishers but in this case, they deserved it.

But as long as they don’t go back to their old-corrupt slow-loading ways (and I don’t think they dare), AMP can probably be considered successful and retired.

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#94 2018-04-16 16:04:27

colak
Admin
From: Cyprus
Registered: 2004-11-20
Posts: 6,911
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #311073:

You’re in the internationally recognized side, I take it?

Indeed:)


Yiannis
——————————
neme.org | hblack.net | LABS | State Machines | NeMe @ github

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#95 2018-04-16 19:27:22

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

michaelkpate wrote #311075:

…pages that loaded in 1-2 seconds instead of 20-30.

I guess your not talking about a Txp site, or are you?

What was it about the site prior to AMP that was making it so slow?


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#96 2018-04-16 19:36:42

bici
Member
From: vancouver
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,315
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

i had never heard of AMP until now

I have become an internet relic.


…. texted postive

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#97 2018-04-16 20:18:00

jakob
Moderator
From: Germany
Registered: 2005-01-20
Posts: 3,159
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

bici wrote #311081:

i had never heard of AMP until now

I have become an internet relic.

Who knows? I think there’s a good chance that in X years AMP will have become a relic but you will still be here :-)


TXP Builders – finely-crafted code, design and txp

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#98 2018-04-16 20:50:44

michaelkpate
Moderator
From: Avon Park, FL
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,118
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #311080:

I guess your not talking about a Txp site, or are you?

What was it about the site prior to AMP that was making it so slow?

Here is a great example. The author, Dean Murphy, was trying to figure out why iMore was so slow to load.

With no content blocked, there are 38 3rd party scripts (scripts not hosted on the host domain) running when the homepage is opened, which takes a total of 11 seconds. Some of these scripts are hosted by companies I know, Google, Amazon, Twitter and lots from companies I don’t know. Most of which I assume are used to display adverts or track my activity, as the network activity was still active after a minute of leaving the page dormant. I decided to turn them all off all 3rd party scripts and see what would happen. After turning off all 3rd party scripts, the homepage took 2 seconds to load, down from 11 seconds. Also, the network activity stopped as soon as the page loaded so it should be less strain on the battery. – An hour with Safari Content Blocker in iOS 9

I can remember (and probably most everyone here can) when the goal was to get your page to load to load in as few kbs as possible. Then came broadband and it didn’t matter as much. And more and more sites – especially news-oriented – started flat out abusing this.

You don’t have to like Google to think things are definitely better now.

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#99 2018-04-16 22:17:16

phiw13
Plugin Author
From: Japan
Registered: 2004-02-27
Posts: 1,546
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #311074:

You probably don’t want to hear what I would suggest about AMP (Google in general).

I didn’t mention what I think about AMP (and Google…). It is not nice.

But I don’t know what kind of data AMP has access to in your code. Depends on what’s marked up, I guess. If it’s got fingers on private data, then me thinks that would concern the third-party ‘pocessor’ sections of the GDPR because that’s what Google is in that case, I think. You’re not paying them to process data, but you’ve kind of entered an agreement with them to do so by using their “free” service.

Given the Google tradition of bending the shape of light to get its grubby hand on data, I’m not optimistic about what they try to get. But yeah, like you, “third party processor” is probably relevant here. That needs thus be noted in the Privacy policy, as far as I understand it.

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#100 2018-04-17 07:36:53

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

<destry::rant type="mild" />

You’re not the target here, Michael, just the trigger.

michaelkpate wrote #311084:

Here is a great example. The author, Dean Murphy, was trying to figure out why iMore was so slow to load.

So, when you say “we” (earlier), you’re not talking about a site you and some collaborators own, but “we” in the sense we are all benefactors of the benevolent Google?

Google, to name one tech monopoly, got us into this mess to begin with, by seed-blasting the concept of more, more, more and getting the zombies hooked on their free drugs. Google can take AMP and stick it, along with its contributions to American military defense.

Hey, Google! 🖕🏻

I can remember (and probably most everyone here can) when the goal was to get your page to load to load in as few kbs as possible.

You say that like it’s not the goal anymore. ;)

Granted, yes, there are too many abusers, both oblivious of the fact and knowingly so. As there are in every other aspect of human society. One look at comments on any randomly-selected YouTube video demonstrates everything you need to know about the intelligence of the former. Your mention of news media, corrupt with surveillance capitalism, is the epitome of the latter.

Nevertheless, I see articles all the time from people conscientious about page size and loading times, and getting rid of the crap that causes the problems — the kind of crap Google and other tech giants love to dish out. These conscientious people are nobodies who nevertheless fight the good fight to big names in the web industry, Aral comes to mind (though a reputation to maintain, thus his ubiquitous presence in the platforms he chides). We don’t even have to look beyond this community to see people talking about benchmarks and speeds of this feature or that content item. But then we are a conscientious group here, no?

Then came broadband and it didn’t matter as much. And more and more sites – especially news-oriented – started flat out abusing this.

Yes, again, lots of abusers. Certainly more than otherwise. Which is exactly why ‘re-revolution’ and resistance is important. Caving to the tech monopolies is a fast-track to a lobotomy.

Another thing that always nags me about technology (and I admit I’m a rare bird here, unfortunately), especially web technology, is how much energy it demands, which is measurably disastrous on the environment. Point is, we need — by the very idea of saving our critical biome — to adopt a conservation stance when it comes to web tech. Not a glutton stance to fill up free cloud quotas and bloat websites with script injections just because we can. That is the thinking of evil-doers and denialists. Devil spirits out! 🤪

You don’t have to like Google to think things are definitely better now.

On the contrary, I think a lot in the world now has never been more precipitous, and tech monopolies like Google are one big reason why.

The worst thing humanity can keep doing is throwing technology at issues that simply need less of it.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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