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#1 2018-03-15 10:06:07

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

The Full Point。

Esteemed peers, colleagues, and gentlefolk of the corkboard,

I am close to launching my new website, The Full Point。 (the ideographic mark is part of the name, but I’ll use TFP hereon). The site replaces writing I used to do at wion.com. The latter is becoming a single resume-like page to profile the professional side of my split personalities and replace my LinkedIn account. One tactic of many in my emigration off centralized platforms.

TFP is a less popular reference to the punctuation mark, the period. Yes, I have specifically not chosen ‘full stop’ due to it’s more-common use as a website name, and because it’s chiefly British. I’ve a yank soul.

TFP is my new dedicated place to write and publish under a proper name. The whole site is simply articles (will be chiefly long-form) and I’ve spent some time thinking about a compact IA in that respect, something even different from a classic blog site.

The main differences I’m trying out are:

Homepage (default) is the Archive page (called “Reading Menu”). I don’t want a separate Archive section. Here articles are initially grouped by loose genres I expect to write in. (Tags will be a different thing added down the road.)

No topic organization reflected in URLs. Every article shares the same format: domain.tld/title-of-article. I do have an About article managed by it’s own Txp section, but that’s only for backend reasons at the moment. On the front it looks and behaves like a regular article.

No common navigation system (e.g. Home, Blog, Archive, Contact). Because my site has only 2 simple views (Reading menu and full articles), I have no need for a conventional nav menu. The homepage does not have a nav menu at all. The articles page has a articles-relevant menu, currently left-to-right as: Previous, Next, Latest, All. Flexbox lays these out wonderfully. Old browsers be damned. (While doing this menu, I thought how convenient it would be to have a <txp:link_to_latest /> tag, much like the link_to_next and link_to_prev tags, but it’s still easy to achieve with an <txp:article_custom /> tag, of course, once you add in all the attributes too.

One sacrifice with this kind of articles-based menu is the seeming inability to get class=“active” states on the menu anchors, because the menu items are not simply static Section anchors, so the context is lost. Hover states do work on the li elements, so it’s a small compromise I can live with. (Better wait until you see the site before getting into conversations on this aspect.)

There is a common footer, however, where a link to the About article is available, and there’s also a small blurb above the home reading menu that points to the About article too, as well it appears in the regular reading menu. So that’s covered. And when the contact form arrives, that will simply be a single link in the footer too, and that page will have a single obvious link back to the homepage. The site logo, of course, is a common homepage link as well.

All in all a little different than the common model of site organization and navigation, but still intuitive, I hope, due to the lack of breadth and depth. The focus and use-case is entirely centered on reading full articles.

I have two questions of the utmost importance

Now, mes confrères de la plume, I need your first reflections…

First, regarding the left-to-right article-based menu order mentioned above. What seems more logical to you, as mentioned or the exact inverse (i.e. All, Latest, Next, Previous)? Other combinations don’t seem as logical to me, so either one or the other, I think.

Second, TFP has a tagline, “Getting __ the end.” Again, I’m torn between one of two things for the missing preposition; either “at” or “in”. Here are the relevant factors for tagline consideration in the order of importance:

  1. This site is suffering no fools or senses of propriety. I will tell people/places/things to fcuk off there if I want to, and I probably will in not so blunt terms.
  2. The tagline is primarily a play on the name, as it should be.
  3. It’s also loosely implying the notion of “getting the point”, because a lot of my writing will be argumentation based and things need to be clear; readers need to get it.
  4. It’s meant to be a bit cheeky, if you see what I mean.

Getting at the end” serves the first two factors well, but kind of loses the cheekiness.

Getting in the end” still serves the first two factors, I believe (by a different sense of time scale, if you will), but also buggers the cheeky factor. ;)

Which one sits better with you? Why?

Of course, it’s a small matter to change the word at any time after launch and nobody would even notice. But I’m a stickler for details and need some third-party perspective to weigh in this case.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#2 2018-03-15 15:19:09

Bloke
Developer
From: Leeds, UK
Registered: 2006-01-29
Posts: 8,458
Website

Re: The Full Point。

The menu system as described works for me as a left-to-right reader. Alternatively, Latest on the left, prev/next in the middle and All on the right, though that might go belly up depending on how you collapse things on small screens.

As for the tagline, it must lose something in the yank-brit translation. Neither seem grammatically correct to me. I want to know “the end of what”. But then, I’m a bit thick when it comes to that kind of stuff. It took me ages to get the EA games tagline “If it’s in the game, it’s in the game.” Only realised after many years that it was referring to the parallel between the sport (for real) and the game (on the console), duh. But Peperami’s slogan that supported the ad campaign “It’s a bit of an animal” I got straight away. A stick of Peperami is a bit of an animal. Shudder to think which bit!

So, in summary, *shrug*.


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#3 2018-03-15 16:08:00

jakob
Moderator
From: Germany
Registered: 2005-01-20
Posts: 3,160
Website

Re: The Full Point。

You could … leave out the preposition. It’s cheeky, needs the visitor’s engagement to complete (and to get (the point of)), stands on its own if need be. What is perhaps not so ideal – depending on your viewpoint and own sense of humo(u)r – is that it is open to other interpretations such as … erm … there in or past or over


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#4 2018-03-16 08:29:48

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: The Full Point。

Bloke wrote #309958:

The menu system as described works for me…

👍

As for the tagline, it must lose something in the yank-brit translation…

Thanks. I’ve been stewing over it now, and I think you’re right. There’s a disjuncture between the name and tagline. I started thinking of it more as the point to be taken, rather than the punctuation. I wanted both, but it’s not melding. Your other examples are good ones. Or if my site was called The Clue, a good tagline would be “Getting one.” Though a bit like a hammer to the head.

I’ll have to think about a new one altogether, and maybe not use one at all until I’ve got something better.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#5 2018-03-16 08:33:29

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: The Full Point。

jakob wrote #309961:

You could … leave out the preposition…

Getting it … the end.

Hmm… adding the ellipsis may work, taking out the room for too much interpretation.

It’s a little smug, but I kind of like it. ;)

Or could just remove the mystery entirely, get straight to the point

Getting it. The end.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#6 2018-03-16 08:53:17

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,020
Website

Re: The Full Point。

Ooo, I might have it…

The Full Point
Nothing less will do.

The play there is on the sense of completion, both at the sentence structure level and the thought to be taken (secondarily). For example, similar to the opposing camps on use of the Oxford comma, there’s a sillier one with regard to millenials using periods or not, Period. Full Stop. Point. Whatever It’s Called, It’s Going Out of Style

I don’t prescribe to that view, largely because I’ve become anti-centralized, and I reference that article in my About copy for the site, so that’s looking strong.

Yep. Decided. Going with it.

Thanks, gents. This is why I asked. ;)


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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