Textpattern CMS support forum

You are not logged in. Register | Login | Help

#441 2018-07-19 10:26:59

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,172
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

While I’m on that little rant, I should probably add…

Trill and OpenBook are two centralized platforms I would never use, but they might appeal to many users (albeit not the ego-driven, rage-infused celebrities) of Twitter and Facebook, respectively, and be much better options.

I know the fediverse is the domain of decentralizationists (though many still happily use centralized platforms, and vice versa) but if centralized upstarts help pull from big tech usage as the latters’ reputations continue to erode, that’s a good thing, I think.

There are certain stupid, geeky brand names I’m just sick of hearing and seeing. Time for some new ones, both centralized and decentralized, and especially more of the latter.

Trill is cool because their is no data collected to use it, not even an email address, and your identity is 100% anonymous. You have no choice. And that it’s created by a group of high schoolers is impressive. (Though that’s probably the end-user demographic.)

OpenBook (an odd choice of name, all things considered), comes out of France and has a much more ethical model of operation, not the least of which is no ads and a sizeable donation to charity of all profits.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

Offline

#442 2018-07-19 12:55:32

michaelkpate
Moderator
From: Avon Park, FL
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,154
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

bici wrote #313071:

“We have to guard against the tendency for social media to become purely a platform for spectacle and outrage and disinformation.”
Barack Obama

He should know because his Administration mastered using social media to manipulate the press and the uninformed. If you have never read The Aspiring Novelist Who Became Obama’s Foreign-Policy Guru, I recommend it.

This is from Ben Rhodes, his deputy National Security Adviser (who coincidentally is the brother of CBS News President David Rhodes).

In the spring of last year, legions of arms-control experts began popping up at think tanks and on social media, and then became key sources for hundreds of often-clueless reporters. “We created an echo chamber,” he admitted, when I asked him to explain the onslaught of freshly minted experts cheerleading for the deal. “They were saying things that validated what we had given them to say.” When I suggested that all this dark metafictional play seemed a bit removed from rational debate over America’s future role in the world, Rhodes nodded. “In the absence of rational discourse, we are going to discourse the [expletive] out of this,” he said. “We had test drives to know who was going to be able to carry our message effectively, and how to use outside groups like Ploughshares, the Iran Project and whomever else. So we knew the tactics that worked.” He is proud of the way he sold the Iran deal. “We drove them crazy,” he said of the deal’s opponents.

Also:

When I later visited Obama’s former campaign mastermind David Axelrod in Chicago, I brought up the soft Orwellian vibe of an information space where old media structures and hierarchies have been erased by Silicon Valley billionaires who convinced the suckers that information was “free” and everyone with access to Google was now a reporter. Axelrod, a former newspaperman, sighed. “It’s not as easy as standing in front of a press conference and speaking to 70 million people like past presidents have been able to do,” he said. The bully pulpit by and large doesn’t exist anymore, he explained. “So more and more, over the last couple of years, there’s been an investment in alternative means of communication: using digital more effectively, going to nontraditional sources, understanding where on each issue your constituencies are going to be found,” he said. “I think they’ve approached these major foreign-policy challenges as campaign challenges, and they’ve run campaigns, and those campaigns have been very sophisticated.”

Early on, Rhodes asked her to create a rapid-response account that fact-checked everything related to the Iran deal. “So, we developed a plan that was like: The Iran deal is literally going to be the tip of everything that we stand up online,” Somanader says. “And we’re going to map it onto what we know about the different audiences we’re dealing with: the public, pundits, experts, the right wing, Congress.” By applying 21st-century data and networking tools to the white-glove world of foreign affairs, the White House was able to track what United States senators and the people who worked for them, and influenced them, were seeing online — and make sure that no potential negative comment passed without a tweet. As she explained how the process worked, I was struck by how naïve the assumption of a “state of nature” must seem in an information environment that is mediated less and less by experienced editors and reporters with any real prior knowledge of the subjects they write about. “People construct their own sense of source and credibility now,” she said. “They elect who they’re going to believe.” For those in need of more traditional-seeming forms of validation, handpicked Beltway insiders like Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic and Laura Rozen of Al-Monitor helped retail the administration’s narrative. “Laura Rozen was my RSS feed,” Somanader offered. “She would just find everything and retweet it.”

Obama is right but we should have been doing this a long time ago.

Offline

#443 2018-07-19 15:08:41

bici
Member
From: vancouver
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,437
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Thanks for the updates michaelkpate and destry.
I have some reading ahead of me.


…. texted postive

Offline

#444 2018-07-19 15:30:06

michaelkpate
Moderator
From: Avon Park, FL
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,154
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Getting back to the EU-Google Ruling:

Today the situation is very different: that contractual limitation could go away tomorrow (or, more accurately, in 90 days), and it wouldn’t really matter because, as I explained above, many apps are no longer Android apps but are rather Google Play apps. To run on an Android fork is by no means impossible, but most would require more rework than simply uploading to a new App Store. In short, in my estimation the real antitrust issue is Google contractually foreclosing OEMs from selling devices with non-Google versions of Android; the only way to undo that harm in 2018, though, would be to make Google Play Services available to any Android fork. – The European Commission Versus Android

I think this is exactly right. Most people who buy an Android Phone are going to expect to get Chrome and Google as defaults so most OEMs are going to change it anyway. And since most of them I assume at this point have a collection of Apps from the Play Store they are going to want that as well. This could actually work out to Google’s benefit but even if it doesn’t it probably won’t be much of a loss either.

Offline

#445 2018-07-30 16:08:23

colak
Admin
From: Cyprus
Registered: 2004-11-20
Posts: 7,153
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

An oldie but still relevant nocookielaw.com/


Yiannis
——————————
neme.org | hblack.net | LABS | State Machines | Respbublika! | NeMe @ github

Offline

#446 2018-08-01 10:05:17

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,172
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Granted this is The Register (and the url-title is amusing), but…

Make Facebook, Twitter, Google et al liable for daft garbage netizens post online

Other elements of the proposal include calls for requiring:

  • . . .
  • adopting data protection rules similar to Europe’s GDPR;
  • . . .

There’s a big list of proposed regs that item comes from, and I think this US senator (Democrat) might actually have grasp of tech enough (or decent advisors) to know where to attack the problems. Because leaving it to ‘the users’ to police their own socmed actions is never going to work.

On the other hand, the list is so big it seems very unlikely to succeed, and especially if dems don’t swing back into the saddle.

The point of sharing this though is only to point out yet another sign that gdpr-like policies are gaining favour beyond the EU, and we’re only 4 months out of the gate.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

Offline

#447 2018-08-01 12:37:41

michaelkpate
Moderator
From: Avon Park, FL
Registered: 2004-02-24
Posts: 1,154
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #313193:

Because leaving it to ‘the users’ to police their own socmed actions is never going to work. On the other hand, the list is so big it seems very unlikely to succeed, and especially if dems don’t swing back into the saddle. The point of sharing this though is only to point out yet another sign that gdpr-like policies are gaining favour beyond the EU, and we’re only 4 months out of the gate.

This isn’t actually a new idea, especially for the Democratic Party. A century ago, Woodrow Wilson put George Creel in charge of the Committee of Public Information. Oh, and:

President Wilson sponsored the Espionage and Sedition Acts, prohibiting interference with the draft and outlawing criticism of the government, the armed forces, or the war effort. Violators were imprisoned or fined. Some 1,500 people were arrested for violating these laws, including Eugene V. Debs, leader of the Socialist Party. The Post Office was empowered to censor the mail, and more than 400 periodicals were deprived of mailing privileges for greater or lesser periods of time. The Supreme Court upheld the Espionage and Sedition Acts as constitutional. – Woodrow Wilson: Domestic Affairs

Putting on my political hat for just a moment: I was really hoping this entire episode would teach the Left that their obsession with the Strong Executive Model was a really bad idea but, exactly as I feared, they seem to be drawing the wrong conclusions.

Offline

#448 2018-08-01 13:02:59

phiw13
Plugin Author
From: Japan
Registered: 2004-02-27
Posts: 1,625
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #313193:

Granted this is The Register (and the url-title is amusing), but…

Make Facebook, Twitter, Google et al liable for daft garbage netizens post online

There’s a big list of proposed regs that item comes from, and I think this US senator (Democrat) might actually have grasp of tech enough (or decent advisors) to know where to attack the problems. Because leaving it to ‘the users’ to police their own socmed actions is never going to work (…)

Hmm. a few points in that list are maybe (maybe!) worth thinking about, but much is typical “liberal” (in the US definition of it) nanny state, sorry.

michaelkpate wrote #313196:

Putting on my political hat for just a moment: I was really hoping this entire episode would teach the Left that their obsession with the Strong Executive Model was a really bad idea but, exactly as I feared, they seem to be drawing the wrong conclusions.

I hope that by “the Left” you mean the Democratic party (US edition), which is (and always has been) a fairly right of center thing (I try to remain polite… family site etc) and known to be very good at doubling down on their mistakes. Other people call it simply the “fake left”.

Offline

#449 2018-08-01 13:21:18

colak
Admin
From: Cyprus
Registered: 2004-11-20
Posts: 7,153
Website

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

So the problem is not so much the collected info but What is done with it… How it is used. I’m talking about:

  1. The big data hoarded by the big companies
  2. The big data collected by governments (I had to put this one here too).

Small to medium site sizes which is what consist most of the net, are not the enemy (depending on their content of course). This law was voted in, not so much for any such sites but because of the big boys. As such, they are passing blanket laws because of them, and the rest of us try to comply. The big companies basic response is that if anyone wants to continue to use their services, they will have to accept to be monitored and monetised.

I can not see how this law will make the web/world better.


Yiannis
——————————
neme.org | hblack.net | LABS | State Machines | Respbublika! | NeMe @ github

Offline

#450 2018-08-01 13:49:45

gaekwad
Member
From: People's Republic of Cornwall
Registered: 2005-11-19
Posts: 2,436

Re: Txp cookies, visitor logging, and GDPR stuff in general

Destry wrote #310778:

Well, every web server records IP address, doesn’t it?

No. Many (most?) do, but logging can be very specific and include/exclude info. There’s also the YAGNI movement who don’t care two hoots about that kind of info.

My go-to web server is Nginx (thanks largely to makss making Textpattern officially Nginx-friendly). There’re a handful of directives that define the level of logging, and the format. So, at a global level, I have this directive:

log_format ipscrubbed '$remote_addr_ipscrub - $remote_user [$time_local] "$request" $status $body_bytes_sent "$http_referer" "$http_user_agent" "$http_x_forwarded_for" "$gzip_ratio"';

This defines a log format called ipscrubbed and the fields within said log format. I compile Nginx from source because I use ipscrub which smushes the IP address into a salted hash, and rotates the hash every 7 days. I can see who’s misbehaving, but I can’t block that person at an IP level – user agent, that I can do something with (so I can block bots etc), but thugs who bounce around on VPN/Tor IPs are always going to be a step ahead.

I’m learning how naxsi works at the moment, so I can roll that out as well. That’s a web application firewall with rules, rather than a list of bad actors to block.

Challenges right now include figuring out how to handle error logs. They can’t be defined in the same way as access logs, so I have to be careful about how long I store the error logs for. The error logs are critical errors rather than simple 404s etc, so it’s usually things that have exploded or backfired in some way.

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB